A Weather Geek's Homepage

Home Clouds Linux Videos Meteosat Photos Links

Cloud Identification

Low Clouds

Middle Clouds

High Clouds

And

Misc. Phenomena

And also

Glossary and height table.


Stratus

Sorry, no images of stratus are available yet.

Back to top of this page


Stratocumulus

Stratocumulus
no pop-up
Stratocumulus
no pop-up
Stratocumulus
no pop-up

Back to top of this page


Cumulus

Cumulus
no pop-up
Cumulus
no pop-up
Cumulus
no pop-up
Cumulus
no pop-up
Cumulus
no pop-up
Cumulus
no pop-up
Cumulus
no pop-up

Back to top of this page


Cumulonimbus

Cumulonimbus
no pop-up
Cumulonimbus
no pop-up

Back to top of this page


Nimbostratus

Sorry, no images of nimbostratus are available yet.

Back to top of this page


Altostratus

Altostratus
no pop-up
Altostratus
no pop-up

Back to top of this page


Altocumulus

Altocumulus
no pop-up
Altocumulus
no pop-up
Altocumulus
no pop-up
Altocumulus
no pop-up
Altocumulus
no pop-up
Altocumulus
no pop-up

Back to top of this page


Cirrus

Cirrus
no pop-up
Cirrus
no pop-up
Cirrus
no pop-up
Cirrus
no pop-up

Back to top of this page


Cirrostratus

Cirrostratus
no pop-up
Cirrostratus
no pop-up

Back to top of this page


Cirrocumulus

Cirrocumulus
no pop-up

Back to top of this page


Misc. Phenomena

Anvil top of cumulonimbus
no pop-up
Contrails
no pop-up
Squall line
no pop-up

Back to top of this page

The following table lists general heights (in feet) for clouds within a certain range of latitude:


0 - 30 30 - 60 60 - 90
HIGH CLOUDS 20,000-60,000 18,500-45,000 10,000-25,000
MID. CLOUDS 6,500-20,000 6,500-18,500 6,500-10,000
LOW CLOUDS SURFACE-6,500 SURFACE-6,500 SURFACE-6,500


Glossary

ABCD EFGHIJKLM NOPQ RSTUV WXYZ

ALTOCUMULUS: (genus) A middle level cloud, often in the form of ripples and waves, that contains many small, connected, round elements. These cloud elements are usually smaller than those in stratocumulus, but larger than those in cirrocumulus.

ALTOSTRATUS: (genus) A middle level cloud that is generally flat and uniform throughout its layer.

ARCUS: The lower part of a cumulonimbus or cumulus cloud that juts out ahead of it.

CALVUS: (specie) Indicates a lack of an "anvil" top on a cumulonimbus cloud.

CAPILLATUS: (specie) Indicates the presence of an "anvil" top on a cumulonimbus cloud. The anvil consists of thick cirrus (see INCUS).

CASTELLANUS: (specie) A cloud in the form of "towers" and "turrets". Most often associated with altocumulus, but can be seen on stratocumulus, cirrus, and cirrocumulus.

CIRRIFORM: High level clouds that are thin and wispy-looking.

CIRROCUMULUS: (genus) A high level cloud that contains many small, connected, elements. Cirrocumulus contains the smallest element of any cumuliform cloud. When seen, it is often referred to as a "mackeral" sky; resembling the scales of this fish.

CIRROSTRATUS: (genus) A high level cloud that is generally flat and uniform throughout its layer.

CIRRUS: (genus) A high level cloud that is thin and wispy, and often takes the shape of a horses tail.

Back to glossary index

CONGESTUS: (specie) A cumulus cloud of moderate to great vertical extent, often taking the shape of a "cauliflower". Also known as towering cumulus, when of great vertical extent.

CUMULIFORM: Clouds that are puffy in shape and predominantly white in color.

CUMULONIMBUS: (genus) A massive low level cloud, with or without an "anvil" top, reaching great heights (60,000ft in the tropics!). Lightning, tornadoes, hail, and high winds are often associated with this destructive cloud.

CUMULUS: (genus) A puffy low level cloud.

DUPLICATUS: (variety) A cloud having two or more layers, which may overlap. Mainly associated with middle and high level clouds.

FIBRATUS: (specie) A cirriform cloud that is fibrous. Associated with cirrostratus and cirrus.

FLOCCUS: (specie) A cloud with puffy elements. Mainly associated with middle and high level clouds.

FRACTUS: (specie) A cloud having a fragmented, shredded appearance. Associated with cumulus and stratus clouds.

HUMILIS: (specie) A cumulus cloud of low vertical extent; a basic cumulus cloud.

INCUS: The fibrous cirrus "anvil" top of a cumulonimbus cloud.

Back to glossary index

INTORTUS: (variety) Cirrus clouds whose wispy tails are all tangled and intertwined.

LACUNOSUS: (variety) A cloud with many fringed circular spaces within it, leading one to relate this cloud to a "honeycomb". Associated with altocumulus and cirrocumulus.

LENTICULARIS: (specie) Clouds in the shape of "flying saucers" and lenses. Associated mainly with altocumulus, but also with stratocumulus and cirrocumulus.

MAMMATUS: A cloud having regularly arranged, udder-like appendages beneath its base. Mammatus below a cumulonimbus cloud is often associated with severe weather.

MEDIOCRIS: (specie) A cumulus cloud of moderate vertical extent.

NEBULOSUS: (specie) A flat, bland-looking cloud. Associated with stratiform clouds.

NIMBOSTRATUS: (genus) A middle level, dark, stratiform cloud that often lowers into the low etage. This cloud is associated with long periods of steady rain.

OPACUS: (variety) A cloud that is able (predominantly) to hide the sun or moon.

PANNUS: Fragmented clouds (fractus) below Cumulonimbus and Nimbostratus clouds.

PERLUCIDUS: (variety) A cloud with translucent spaces in between cloud elements. Associated with altocumulus and stratocumulus.

Back to glossary index

PILEUS: A thin, stratified cloud that forms just above cumulus; usually cumulonimbus.

RADIATUS: (variety) A cloud, in undulatus form, whose rows seem to converge at a point on the horizon.

SPISSATUS: (specie) A dense, cirriform cloud that usually originates from cumulonimbus.

STRATIFORM: Clouds that appear nearly uniform and flat.

STRATOCUMULUS: (genus) A low level cloud, often in the form of waves, that contains large, connected, round elements. These cloud elements are larger than those in altocumulus, and cirrocumulus.

STRATUS: (genus) A low level cloud that is usually uniform in appearance.

TRANSLUCIDUS: (variety) A cloud that is predominantly translucent. Associated with low and middle level clouds.

UNCINUS: (specie) A cirrus cloud in the shape of "hooks" and "horse tails"; the most common cirrus.

UNDULATUS: (variety) A cloud having a wave-like appearance.

VELUM: A thin, stratified cloud that is situated alongside cumulus; usually cumulonimbus.

VERTEBRATUS: (variety) A cloud that looks like vertebrae; usually cirrus.

VIRGA: Precipitation, falling from a cloud, that evaporates before reaching ground. Usually associated with altocumulus castellanus, but can be seen coming from low and high level clouds as well.

Back to top of this page or to glossary index



Linux Online
News for Nerds
Valid HTML 4.01!
New American Dream
The campaign to make poverty
history
Geek: mistral27_at_wxgeek.com
Modified: October 30, 2005
Created with Nedit